istanbul evden eve nakliyat
X

Being a Female, What is your Clothing Style?

 

We all are familiar with the terms print media, electronic media and online media. We have even heard of social media as well. But ever heard of democratic media? This is one of the most evolving concepts affecting the fate of many organizations and famous brands alike. Since graphic designers play a vital role in building a brand identity, I believe they should be well apprised of the terminology and its impact on the corporate world.

Democratic Media – What is it?

The exact definition of "democratic media" provided by Wikipedia says:
 "Democratic Media is the concept of organizing media along democratic lines rather than strictly commercial and/or ideological lines."

However, for my better understanding, I have concieved it somewhat like this:

"It is democratic media, when ordinary citizens have the freedom and access to express their views on any piece of information released or published on internet. Unlike the conventional media that runs on commercial purposes and with an agenda of making profits, the democratic media holds that that information is organized and controlled by ordinary citizens.”

Nevertheless, considering the immensity of this term, I would like to relate this topic specifically with "brands" for my today’s post. This will surely make it more apprehensible for my readers and me.

 

Democratic Media – Power of people:

The biggest proponent of democratic media is the rise of social media sites and blogs where people are open to share their views and opinions. The chief reason for the level of influence is the ease of access to these kinds of media platforms. Almost every and anyone can join the discussions and openly share their opinions and judgments. Following are a few noteworthy influences of democratic media on the corporate world:

• It increases consumerism and protects the rights of consumers.

• Provides the public with freedom of speech and expression of opinions.

• It shrinks the power of famous brands to impose their will on consumers.

• Promotes fair, independent and accountable information to the public.

• Limits the creative skills and approach of Graphic Designers.

 

Democratic Media – Shrinking the Power of Brands:

Gap fiasco – The fallout:

 
Gap fiasco is the best example to explain the power of Democratic Media. Gap had to revert back to its old logo within days of launching its logo redesign in 2010. Have you thought who forced the famous brand to take back its decision? Yes, it was the common people and regular Gap customers who created a chaos on internet by posting lengthy comments on blogs and social media platforms telling how much they hated the redesign. While the intentions of redesigning the logo were substantially optimistic, it was severely criticized over the online and social media platforms. It is things like these raise the question…Is rebranding a mistake?
 

BP Logo Parody:

Then there is the case of Oil Giant British Petroleum (BP). After the massive oil spill last year, BP was immensely condemned by people on the internet. The censure went to the extent of ridiculing BP logo. Social activist group Greenpeace UK attempted to tarnish the corporate image of BP by setting up a logo design contest to ridicule their logo. One cannot even imagine the amount of damage this has inflicted on BP’s branding. Only those who are aware of the cost of rebranding can understand it. This raises yet another question…Does public power reign supreme over the power of brand?
 
 
The increased influence of the general public as a major stakeholder in corporations prove that graphic designers are quiet threatened and alarmed of customer reactions while carrying out any corporate venture. Graphic designers now seem to realise the impact of democratic media on the well being of any business or enterprise.
 

Your Say:

Before I conclude my post I would like to know your thoughts on one of the points I mentioned above:
 
“Democratic Media has limited the creative skills and approach of the Graphic Designers”
 
Don’t you think graphic designers have become very much obliged to consumers likes and dislikes? Ignoring their imaginative ideas and theories, they are creating those concepts, which the brand customers would like to see. Doesn’t this leave the graphic designers in a strange dilemma?
 

Author Charlie B. Johnson

has written Posts 388 .

  1. Jonathan Gale On January 4th, 2011 at 8:55 am
    1

    It certainly stopped Gap making a big mistake!

  1. Tina Garg On January 4th, 2011 at 8:28 pm
    2

    Thanks for a wonderful post! Thought-provoking! Have shared it on my blog with a link to yours. Hope that’s ok with you. I do enjoy most of your posts. Tks again!!!

  1. Need developers On January 7th, 2011 at 4:47 am
    3

    The content of the post is very true. Off-course today’s designers are in a state of dilemma in using their creativity and thinking. As money matters they are succumbing to the needs of the brand owners. This post has ignited the scope of thinking

  1. Andrew On January 7th, 2011 at 12:55 pm
    4

    I think it does leave them in a weird place because how are they going to put there mark on it.

    At what point does your work matter. If the consumers are the ones that can make or break you thats going to be a hard thing to deal with.

    Like the Gap fiasco: Gap thinking it was doing a great thing and then being torn down and made to go back. How much money was wasted on that.

    Social media is great but also its a double edge sword when someone try’s something new. At what point do you not care and create something from you.

    I wonder how the Starbucks new brand look will go over

  1. Brickum On January 8th, 2011 at 4:24 pm
    5

    I’m gonna exercise my democratic media rights, and respectfully disagree lol. Yes, social media has brought about new found voice to the before unheard mass, but if you care about your brand’s image you will certainly take steps to avoid such PR nightmares. BP was on a brand identity crash course regardless of democratic media. If they would’ve taken a more strict stance towards protecting the environment from the beginning, it would’ve prevented such a situation, and in the end even strengthened their identity. Gap on the other hand was just asking for it, and the only threat to graphic designers is to whoever let that logo push through to completion. If anything, I believe graphic design will benefit from companies that recklessly tarnish their identity, as they’ll usually come looking for a quick fix instead of fixing the real problem. The more savvy brands already know not to limit designer creativity, as they understand it can potentially connect on a deeper emotional level than something merely devised with such intentions. If Gap would’ve allowed for that creativity, I’m sure that logo would’ve never existed. These are just my opinions, but I think in most cases negative public relations can always be traced back to the source; democratic media only speeding up the process.

  1. Lovely On January 10th, 2011 at 2:32 pm
    6

    I think your point definitely leaves Designers with a big dilemma – How far do you take a rebranding? Some organizations don’t allow their rebranding to stray far from their originals (the Government for instance) but others let the designers go to town. My opinion – Designers need to be smart about their designs. Going above and beyond for a redesign may not always be the right choice. For instance, with Gap, I would have started by just updating the type, maybe modernizing the spacing within the square – simple is always better. My Take out on this – THINK before you design! Great post, thanks a lot! :)

  1. Kevin Wijaya On January 11th, 2011 at 10:53 am
    7

    I’m more or less agree and disagree at the same time.

    It’s true that the effect of social media limits the creativity of designers. However, I think that some creative logos can still go through, if it has enough creativity and aesthetic.

    People like to see something new. If you somehow managed to make something that other people haven’t ever thought before, it will give them surprise, and will get relatively good response.

  1. Tracie Wells On January 12th, 2011 at 6:28 pm
    8

    I think it does leave them in a weird place because how are they going to put there mark on it. At what point does your work matter. If the consumers are the ones that can make or break you thats going to be a hard thing to deal with. Like the Gap fiasco: Gap thinking it was doing a great thing and then being torn down and made to go back. How much money was wasted on that. Social media is great but also its a double edge sword when someone try’s something new. At what point do you not care and create something from you. I wonder how the Starbucks new brand look will go over

  1. Free vector graphics On January 18th, 2011 at 7:14 am
    9

    As most of us know graphic designers play a vital role in building a brand identity, I believe they should be well apprised of the terminology and its impact on the corporate world.

  1. Corporate Graphic Designer On January 21st, 2011 at 4:01 pm
    10

    I do think this could possibly be a threat to the creative mind of designers BUT the GAP was a bad example…i’m all for redesign but why would they even want to change the GAP’s logo? everyone knows it so well, it would be like changing McDonalds logo to something completely different. I don’t understand why they did that, and I really don’t understand why they chose that new logo, don’t like it at all, glad its gone.

  1. UR Augmented Reality On January 21st, 2011 at 4:03 pm
    11

    Great post, companies change logos like the wind, I still don’t understand Pepsi changing their logo, such a minimal change, it looks like somebody miss printed it now!!. . . you wouldn’t see coke changing their core brand!!.

  1. Chris - logo designer On January 25th, 2011 at 5:31 am
    12

    This sort of things has happened for a long time but without such a strong global voice. Remember all the t-shirts in the 90s with social statements using logo parody as an avenue to express their point, and damage the brand.

    The reality is that BP’s problems had little to do with their branding and all to do with their actions and inactions. Greenpeace used the logo competition as a way of drawing negative attention to BP.

    GAP could easily have ignored the uproar and it would have soon simmered down and people would have continued to buy their khakis.

    Any responsible brand manager will look to focus groups and the public for reactions but with the public voice getting louder we will find it will be acted upon more and more.


Write for us

 

  • Twitter

    14610
  • Facebook

  • Subscribers

    4,000

 

 


 

 

Recent Post

Categories

Archives

  • Popular Posts

  •